Don’s “The Amateur Eye”

If you follow my chess lessons, especially using Square Count, it largely confirms the system I devised when a kid learning the game of chess. The example game I want to show here is similar to the game won by a New Yorker out of the Buffalo area some years ago which I illustrated. This was played thousands of miles away by two Russians, twenty-year-old GM David Paravyan and IM Saveliy Goluov in 2018 at St. Petersburg. It is a Petroff Defense.

If you follow my chess lessons, especially using Square Count, it largely confirms the system I devised when a kid learning the game of chess. The example game I want to show here is similar to the game won by a New Yorker out of the Buffalo area some years ago which I illustrated. This was played thousands of miles away by two Russians, twenty-year-old GM David Paravyan and IM Saveliy Goluov in 2018 at St. Petersburg. It is a Petroff Defense..e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. N:e5 d6 4. Nf3 N:e4 5. d4 d5 6.Bd3 This system dates back to the 1800s during the era of chess which I call the era of enlightenment.  The current game play continues with 6….Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8, c4 c6 9, Qb3 d:c4 10. B:c4 Nd7 11. Re1 Ndf6 12. N:d2 N:d2 13. B:d2 and Black eyes the loose Q-side choosing to gobble up a pawn

In stage 2 Black chooses to attack the Q-side pawn structure.  What does he see in this plan? He has two Bishops with diagonal pressure on both color square diagonals.  His hope is to counterattack, win a pawn . To quote GM Larry Evans: A PAWN IS A PAWN!  Black should   see this to be at some risk because he figures that the opening of lines and gain in square count will more that offset the pawn loss.  Thus, we see an evaluation emerge featuring plusses and minuses within this planning stage by both players.  Plan continues with 13….Qb6 14. Qd3 Q:b2.

White now gains square-count for material.15. Rab1 Qa3 16. Qc2 Nd5 17. Rb3 Qa4 18. B:d5 c:d5 19. Ng5! Made possible because of the “pin” tactic introduced here.  Black suddenly finds himself facing a classic “king hunt” by White.  19…g6 20. N:h7!  White has noticed the exposure of the black Queen.  What must be going through the mind of Golubov at this point?

20….Bf5 Do you see why Black cannot capture with 20…K:h7??  21. Nf6+ Kg7 22. Bh6+!! K:h6 23. g4+!!  Here the question is: Who is winning? The question must at almost every attacking position is this: did White overestimate and Black will garnish up some more points toward Grandmastership?  For Black now, there is no other move but 23….Bf4 seemingly to justify Black’s own play and position.

Who knows if White found the brilliant 24. Qc7!!! ahead of time but to be sure he had it in his pocket and it gave him a unique brilliancy of the grandest order!  24….B:h6 25. Qe5+ Kg5 26. h4+ K:h4 27. Rh3+! Now, on …K:h3 28. Qg3 mates, so 28. Qe7+ mates with 28…f6 29. Qe3+ K:g4 30. Qg3 mate.  I would vote that Paravyan saw the idea all along.

The product of square-count can be seen in how the squares were eventually eliminated for escape routes.  This is always a classic theme of what checkmate represents on the chessboard.

I hope you enjoyed this presentation and might find it a stimulating and valuable lesson on the 64-squares.

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