The Amateur Eye

It is amazing the number of players whose styles vary with amazing consistency of a broad range of patterns adopted to find a rich variety of positions where the problems that emerge would fill the pages of the dictionary that sits on my book shelf.

I chose the following game taken from New In Chess, Judit Polgar’s, “b3 or not b3” featuring Richard Rapport vs. Alexander Onischuk from the 2014 Olympiad. 1.b3 is the Bent Larsen Opening seen in the Fischer era principally and adopted largely as a system to avoid prepared lines of popular openings.  After, 1. b3 e5 2. Bb2 Nc6 3. e3 Nf6 4. Bb5 Bd6 5. Na3! The alarm bell rings that White is essaying a type of reverse system employed by Black.  To what end?  I think the objective is to just make Black ‘s mind to wonder just how to handle the position.  White hasn’t actually declared himself to a particular strategy. It’s consequence might simply be to gain time on the opponent’s clock.

5. … a6  6. B:c6  d:c6  7. Nc4 Qe7 8. a4 Increasing s/c.

8. O-O 9. a5 Bg4  10. Ne2 Nd7 11. O-O e4 12. N:d6  c:d6  13. f3! e:f3  14. g:f3 Bh3 15. Rf2 Ne5  16. f4 Ng6  17. f5!  Qg5+ 18. Ng3  Ne5  19. Ra4! Bg4 20. Qf1 Another s/c principle of opening up lines by pawn exchanges spells danger for the black forces and opening squares of attack for the Rook in this case brings about a swift decision.  White has with the simplest means built  up control over the major inroads to black weaknesses.  This brings on an immediate blunder with 20…f6 21. B:e5 and then   22. Qc4+.

This presents a perfect example of my use of square count principles.

 

 

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