Kindred’s Special: A Remembrance of a great magazine THE AMERICAN CHESS QUARTERLY

Not many today in the American chess community probably remembers or cares about The American Chess Quarterly,  founded by GM Larry Evans.  It was published from 1961-1965, having a joyful experience for readers  of 16-issues ,  English Descriptive Notation which was the common language of chess notation in America during that period.  Most famous of course was the article written by Bobby Fischer which he called A BUST TO THE KING’S GAMBIT that featured lines starting after 1.P-K4 P-K4  2.P-KB4  PxP 3.N-KB3. Fischer’s analysis led many ardent King Gambiteers to challenge his findings by submitting analysis of their own that questioned the  conclusion. Fischer himself later played 3-games featuring 1.P-K4 P-K4 2.P-KB4 PxP 3.B-B4 which he won with White. Much has been made of this as the principle  remembrance of this wonderful publication that sold for under $3.00  for annual subscription. It was meant for young people and it was Larry Evans hope to reach millions of American youth and adults alike to popularize the game. There were many games and articles written; a regular column by Fred Wren he called THE WOODPUSHER.  So famous and well received was this column that Fred Wren became known affectionately as “The Woodpusher”. While the magazine had a relatively short run of only 16-issues, 4-issues a year, it left a lasting and favorable impression on me. The fact that Fischer chose it to print his article on the King’s Gambit attests to his own admiration for Larry Evans and THE AMERICAN CHESS QUARTERLY.

5 Responses to “Kindred’s Special: A Remembrance of a great magazine THE AMERICAN CHESS QUARTERLY”

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    • kindredspiritks Says:

      Very well organized; I wish I had your knowledge and skill for my own blog. Regarding Bobby Fischer, I drew with him in 1964 at the Kodak simul he gave with 75 players and then agreed to allow up to 50 more as games cleared. The lecture was great and he was a perfect gentleman. It was my second meeting as I played him in a Chess Review postal event when he was 12. His many cards with notes about his homelife, living with his sister and virtually playing his cc games out of his bedroom. He said he read the soviet magazine 64 as well as others. I guess he opened up to me as I was a teenager myself only 4 years older and he told me he was a Christian, was studying the Bible and listening to radio religious broadcasts. He said he was preparing to go to Canada hopefully with Larry Evans and then tour the USA as he was going to become world champion and take the title back to America. He was a very proud American. I liked the kid. I was surprised to see him on the cover of Chess Review and the game of the century he played was absolutely wonderful. I was no longer skeptical about his chances to fulfill his goal.

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